Maps: from 17th Century copperplate etchings to Michael Craig Martin digital prints

Maps: from 17th Century copperplate etchings to Michael Craig Martin digital prints

A blog post from Mary Yacoob on her Canalology project:

As part of my research for my Canalology alternative map artwork, I looked at different the design, colour and decoration of different kinds of maps.

Michael Craig Martin was commissioned by the Serpentine gallery in 2013 to do a map showing where the new gallery extension is sited in relation to their main site. His digitally printed map was given away to visitors, but the gallery was also selling a limited edition (screenprinted perhaps?) prints. The simplified graphic lines and bold pop colours (pink, green and blue) are in keeping with his paintings. http://www.serpentinegalleries.org/shop/map

I also went to a dealer in “Antique Maps, Charts, Plans, Atlases, Globes & Cartographic Reference Books” in London’s West End. They gave me some of their catalogues. I was looking at how cartographers sometimes drew a map in the centre that is surrounded by inserts containing drawings of scenic views or people (real or imagined) related to the mapped area. Some of the maps I was looking at are copperplate etchings from the 1600s. I was also keen to see how they designed their decorative borders. I use a lot of pattern, repetition and symbol in my drawings.

I also looked at Google maps to see how that would differ from the layout on the Canal and River Trust map that was my main reference for my map drawing (see previous post).

 

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